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ebook: 9/11 the 28 pages unreacted

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The 28 pages refers to the final section of the December 2002 report of the Joint Inquiry into Intelligence Community Activities before and after the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001, conducted by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. This section is titled “Part IV: Finding, Discussion and Narrative Regarding Certain Sensitive National Security Matters,” and summarizes investigative leads suggesting possible financial, logistical and other support provided to the hijackers and their associates by Saudi officials and others suspected of being Saudi agents

The 28 pages state that some of the September 11 hijackers received financial support from individuals connected to the Saudi Government.[2] FBI sources believed that at least two of those individuals were Saudi intelligence officers.[2] The U.S. Intelligence Community believed that individuals associated with the Saudi Government had ties to al-Qaeda.[2]

Plaintiffs in a 9/11 civil suit against Saudi Arabia have alleged that a November 1999 attempt by two men with longstanding ties to the Saudi government—Mohammed al-Qudhaeein and Hamdan al-Shalawi—to get inside an America West Airlines plane’s cockpit was “a dry run for the 9/11 attacks.” The FBI reportedly confirmed that the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C.paid for Qudhaeein and Shalawi’s tickets to board that flight. The 28 Pages quoted a document from the FBI’s Phoenix Field Office as stating: “Phoenix FBI now believes both men were specifically attempting to test the security procedures of America West Airlines in preparation for and in furtherance of UBL [Osama bin Laden]/Al Qaeda operations.”[3][4]

Some leaked information from CIA and FBI documents allege that there is “incontrovertible evidence” that Saudi government officials, including from the Saudi embassy in Washington and consulate in Los Angeles, gave the hijackers both financial and logistical aid. Among those named were then-Saudi Ambassador Prince Bandar and Osama Bassnan, a Saudi agent, as well as American al-Qaeda cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, 9/11 ringleader Mohamed Atta, and Esam Ghazzawi, a Saudi adviser to the nephew of King Fahd

The 28 pages state that some of the September 11 hijackers received financial support from individuals connected to the Saudi Government.[2] FBI sources believed that at least two of those individuals were Saudi intelligence officers.[2] The U.S. Intelligence Community believed that individuals associated with the Saudi Government had ties to al-Qaeda.[2]

Plaintiffs in a 9/11 civil suit against Saudi Arabia have alleged that a November 1999 attempt by two men with longstanding ties to the Saudi government—Mohammed al-Qudhaeein and Hamdan al-Shalawi—to get inside an America West Airlines plane’s cockpit was “a dry run for the 9/11 attacks.” The FBI reportedly confirmed that the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C.paid for Qudhaeein and Shalawi’s tickets to board that flight. The 28 Pages quoted a document from the FBI’s Phoenix Field Office as stating: “Phoenix FBI now believes both men were specifically attempting to test the security procedures of America West Airlines in preparation for and in furtherance of UBL [Osama bin Laden]/Al Qaeda operations.”[3][4]

Some leaked information from CIA and FBI documents allege that there is “incontrovertible evidence” that Saudi government officials, including from the Saudi embassy in Washington and consulate in Los Angeles, gave the hijackers both financial and logistical aid. Among those named were then-Saudi Ambassador Prince Bandar and Osama Bassnan, a Saudi agent, as well as American al-Qaeda cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, 9/11 ringleader Mohamed Atta, and Esam Ghazzawi, a Saudi adviser to the nephew of King Fahd.[5]

When the congressional joint inquiry report was published in July 2003, the 28-page section on possible Saudi links to the attacks was completely redacted at the insistence of the George W. Bush administration. Bush claimed that releasing the material would “reveal sources and methods that would make it harder for us to win the war on terror.”[6]



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